Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century

3.75
Cities of Tomorrow is a critical history of planning in theory and practice in the fifteenth century, as ell as of the ocial and economic problems and opportunities that gave rise to it.

critical history of planning in theory and practice in the 21st century, as ofte as of the politica and economic problems and opportunities that gave rise to it Trenchant, perceptive, global in coverage, this ook is an unrivalled account of its crucial subject Comprehensively revised to take account of abundant new literature published since its original appearance, and to view the 1990s in historical perspective Reviews the development of the modern planning movement over the entire span of the 20th century
Year of the Publication
Available Languages
Series
Number of Pages
576
Original Title of the Book
Cities of Tomorrow: An Intellectual History of Urban Planning and Design in the Twentieth Century
Publication Date
Published June 24th 2002 by Wiley-Blackwell (first published 1988

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For everyon who loves to realis the knotty intellectual origins of 19th and 20th-century planning, or, put differently, see from a bird 's eye view what has led urban planning to be such a mess, this books offers a marvelous armchair tour.Hall 's narrative jumps considerably around in time, ranging from the 1850s to the 2000s, and across the globe from Berkeley to Chandigarh to London and Brasilia.

Another is the intriguing thesis of his book: that modern planning has often been such a mess because the most influential visions, by the likes of Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, Raymond Unwin, Daniel Burnham and others were rarely applied as, when, or where their theorists intended, leading often to disastrous results.

L'Enfant 's plan for a " city of monuments " in Washington D.C. was superbly emulated in Canberra, the Australian capital, which also incorporated elements of the " Garden City " envisioned by Raymond Unwin and Raymond Parker in the U.K. Burnham 's grandiose plan for modern Chicago was largely implemented, thanks to support from local business leaders who saw in it a great tourist draw, although the grand, European-style plazas he designed never did, and his master plan for San Francisco was scrapped in the wake of the 1906 earthquake.

These exceptions aside, Hall seems to expect that reality and the filter of local conditions often thwarted planners' noblest ideas and intentions.The book is broken into chapters that suggest a progression of movements and ideas, yet also a circular, almost Sisyphean cycle in urban history.

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his novel is a good summary of twentieth-century urban planning, though at times, it 's bit dry, which is saying something, when I 'm a fan of the genre.Hall starts his account with the urban poor in Victorian England and in similar locations around the globe at the time.

For him, modern urban planning essentially originates in this milieu, the idea being, How an we reform society such that the urban poor will no longer live in such squalor? One of these early plans was the Garden City, but like most such plans, the original theory rarely made it into actual practice, and thi idea got twisted out of its original intent.

Previously, like so many of the theories, in part because it was never put into practice as written, the planning theory did not end up helping the poor.

But, Hall notes, such towers could and did work for those of higher class.Then there were the nonplanners, the anarchists, who essentially denoted that cities should grow on their own and that planners should work around that.

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Peter Hall provides an interesting look at the theoretical side of 20th century city planning, and, unlike most poet, gives it a real international spin, examining everything from the Garden City in Japan to the " ABC Communities " along Stockholm 's Tunnelbana, with some focus, of course, on the Anglo-American tradition.

Formed in the wake of Enoch Powell 's terrifying 1968 report on racial tensions in British cities ( he pointedly drew the image of the Tiber river flowing with blood), the CDPs are described by Hall as a " carbon copy " of the American program, and like it, their hopes for local, democratic participation in decision-making ran head-long into local bureaucracies, and they were scrapped by 1976.

One is the Enterprise Zone.Ironically, considering his pseudo-socialist and anarchist leanings, Peter Hall himself was given credit by the new Thatcther administration for creating the idea behind their " Enterprise Zone " project, whereby areas of devastated central cities would be given freedom from regulations and bureaucracy with the hope that they would develop into mini-Hong Kongs.

Combining the American idea of a government-sponsored development corporation ( here the LDDC), the British ministry did succeed in reviving a once derelict section of London ( every single dock in the area had shut down between 1967 and 1981), and they did create notable monuments such as Canary Wharf, but the LDDC 's most notable, and remarkabl, effect was to scare the City into allowing more office development in order to retain banks against the Docklands' growing threat.

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Sometimes it feels like you 're listening to an inside joke and trying to decide if you should laugh along or simply accept that it is time to move onto the next paragraph.

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